A person with eczema is having a video call with a doctor on her laptop.

Telehealth and Atopic Dermatitis 

Have you considered how telehealth can be used with atopic dermatitis? Today, a medical practice has many options when checking in on a patient. I know that there are those times when you definitely want to see the doctor in-person. Also, they may want to see you in person. However, there are circumstances when you are unable to go into the office. Now is a great time to check with your primary care, dermatologist, or other prescribing medical providers to see what their policy is.

What is telehealth?

What is telehealth? You may already be using telehealth, but didn’t know what it was called. Think about the last time you called to ask for a refill for a skin cream. Maybe you forgot to take an important medication on time or missed a dose, so you phoned the nurse. See, you’re probably already doing some telehealth with atopic dermatitis.

Poll

Have you ever had a telehealth appointment?

Modern telehealth options

  • Logging in into a website to check your lab results
  • Checking email for messages from your clinic
  • Watching videos to learn more about your condition
  • Having a live conference via phone or online with your medical provider
  • Using a patient portal to express a concern with your medical provider
  • Scheduling an in-person or online appointment with a nurse or doctor
  • Texting or emailing pictures of a new rash
  • Asking for refills on a prescription

Building trust and being prepared

It’s important to be prepared and stay calm when using telehealth for atopic dermatitis. We learned that by making a list we felt more confident.

Our experience with telehealth

When my granddaughter Jillian was little, her parents lived in a rural community. Her pediatric dermatologist knew that it was not always easy to come into town if Jill had a flare. In addition, she saw a pediatric gastroenterologist. This doctor's office was 3 hours away. Since there was a special formula and also specific skin creams, they worked together to keep Jill’s tummy and skin comfortable without a long car drive.

Building relationships with doctors

I feel that one of the reasons that telehealth worked so well, was because my daughter had a strong relationship with Jill’s doctors. They had seen the notebook where questions and answers were written during appointments. They could also count on an accurate description of any symptom that our girl was going through.

Paying for a visit

Some health insurance companies are changing the way they allow your doctor to bill. It turns out many doctors are using a special billing code to do a check-up. I did it recently. I filled out a paper from my insurance company and took a picture with my phone. Then I sent it to my medical provider in an email. They took over from there.

Telehealth and atopic dermatitis

My family had a good experience with telehealth and atopic dermatitis long before they called it that. It was a matter of getting, and paying for, the best possible medical care. Remember, there is no substitute for seeing your provider whenever possible. Every situation is different, and it’s great if you have an ongoing discussion with your doctor about how telehealth and atopic dermatitis might work for you. Have you used telehealth to communicate with your doctor?

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This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The AtopicDermatitis.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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