Image Gallery — Atopic Dermatitis in Adults

Common Symptoms

Lichenification
Lichenification
Erythroderma
Erythroderma
Changes in Skin Color
Lichenification

Thickened Skin (Lichenification)

Chronic atopic dermatitis (AD) can cause patches of thickened skin. The thickened skin is also called lichenified, and the process is called lichenification. Lichenified skin may be darker or lighter than surrounding, unaffected skin.
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Lichenification

Thickened Skin (Lichenification)

Chronic atopic dermatitis (AD) can cause patches of thickened skin. The thickened skin is also called lichenified, and the process is called lichenification. Lichenified skin may be darker or lighter than surrounding, unaffected skin.
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Erythroderma

Erythroderma

Atopic dermatitis (AD) can sometimes cause a widespread reddening of the skin, called erythroderma. A scaling (peeling) of the skin and itching usually accompany erythroderma.
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Erythroderma

Erythroderma

Atopic dermatitis (AD) can sometimes cause a widespread reddening of the skin, called erythroderma. A scaling (peeling) of the skin and itching usually accompany erythroderma.
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Changes in Skin Color

Changes in Skin Color

Acute areas of AD can cause changes in skin color, creating redness or darkened areas. Chronic areas of AD can also create changes in skin color, as the skin becomes thickened, or lichenified.
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Changes in Skin Color
Papules (Skin Lesions)
Papules (Skin Lesions)
Changes in Skin Color

Changes in Skin Color

Acute areas of AD can cause changes in skin color, creating redness or darkened areas. Chronic areas of AD can also create changes in skin color, as the skin becomes thickened, or lichenified.
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Papules (Skin Lesions)

Papules (Skin Lesions)

One of the symptoms of atopic dermatitis (AD) is papules: which are small, raised bumps on the skin that may look like pimples without pus.
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Papules (Skin Lesions)

Papules (Skin Lesions)

One of the symptoms of atopic dermatitis (AD) is papules: which are small, raised bumps on the skin that may look like pimples without pus.
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Common Affected Areas (Adults)

Hands and Feet
Flexural surfaces
Face and neck
Hands and Feet

Hands and Feet

In adults, AD affects the inside creases of the elbows or knees, the nape of the neck, face, hands, upper arms, back, wrists, the fingers, feet, and toes. In some people with AD, the rash may cover much of the body, with it being especially noticeable on the face and neck. Other adults only experience AD as hand or foot atopic eczema.
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Flexural surfaces

Flexural surfaces

Atopic dermatitis frequently appears as a rash on the inside creases of the elbows or knees (flexural surfaces).
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Face and neck

Face and neck

In some people with AD, the rash may cover much of the body, with it being especially noticeable on the face and neck.
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Other Types of Dermatitis and Skin Conditions

Contact Dermatitis
Contact Dermatitis
Contact Dermatitis
Contact Dermatitis
Contact Dermatitis
Contact Dermatitis

Contact Dermatitis

Contact dermatitis encompasses both irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Irritant contact dermatitis is a reaction that occurs when the skin comes in contact with a substance that is irritating, such as detergents, soaps, cleaners, or other chemicals. Sometimes, the skin develops an allergy to a substance that comes into contact with it; this is called allergic contact dermatitis.
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Contact Dermatitis

Contact Dermatitis

Contact dermatitis encompasses both irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Irritant contact dermatitis is a reaction that occurs when the skin comes in contact with a substance that is irritating, such as detergents, soaps, cleaners, or other chemicals. Sometimes, the skin develops an allergy to a substance that comes into contact with it; this is called allergic contact dermatitis.
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Contact Dermatitis

Contact Dermatitis

Contact dermatitis encompasses both irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Irritant contact dermatitis is a reaction that occurs when the skin comes in contact with a substance that is irritating, such as detergents, soaps, cleaners, or other chemicals. Sometimes, the skin develops an allergy to a substance that comes into contact with it; this is called allergic contact dermatitis.
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Contact Dermatitis

Contact Dermatitis

Contact dermatitis encompasses both irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Irritant contact dermatitis is a reaction that occurs when the skin comes in contact with a substance that is irritating, such as detergents, soaps, cleaners, or other chemicals. Sometimes, the skin develops an allergy to a substance that comes into contact with it; this is called allergic contact dermatitis.
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Contact Dermatitis

Contact Dermatitis

Contact dermatitis encompasses both irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Irritant contact dermatitis is a reaction that occurs when the skin comes in contact with a substance that is irritating, such as detergents, soaps, cleaners, or other chemicals. Sometimes, the skin develops an allergy to a substance that comes into contact with it; this is called allergic contact dermatitis.
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Other Types of Dermatitis and Skin Conditions

Contact Dermatitis
Dyshidrotic eczema (Pompholyx)
Psoriasis
Neurodermatitis (Lichen simplex chronicus)
Nummular eczema
Contact Dermatitis

Contact Dermatitis

Contact dermatitis encompasses both irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Irritant contact dermatitis is a reaction that occurs when the skin comes in contact with a substance that is irritating, such as detergents, soaps, cleaners, or other chemicals. Sometimes, the skin develops an allergy to a substance that comes into contact with it; this is called allergic contact dermatitis.
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Dyshidrotic eczema (Pompholyx)

Dyshidrotic eczema (Pompholyx)

Dyshidrotic eczema is also called pompholyx or vesicular eczema. Dyshidrotic eczema forms small, itchy, fluid-filled blisters on the fingers, toes, palms of the hands, and soles of the feet and is often a manifestation of other types of eczema, such as atopic dermatitis and contact dermatitis.
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Psoriasis

Psoriasis

It is possible for an individual to have both AD and psoriasis and in some cases, a person may be diagnosed with psoriasiform dermatitis, a type of inflamed skin condition that resembles psoriasis.
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Neurodermatitis (Lichen simplex chronicus)

Neurodermatitis (Lichen simplex chronicus)

Neurodermatitis is similar to atopic dermatitis, as it appears as thick, scaly patches on the skin due to rubbing or scratching of the area. Also known as lichen simplex chronicus, neurodermatitis frequently appears on the nape of the neck, scalp, shoulder, ankles, wrists, backs of the hands, or the feet.
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Nummular eczema

Nummular eczema

Nummular eczema has a distinct appearance from other forms of dermatitis, producing coin-shaped spots on the skin that are frequently itchy. The skin affected by nummular eczema may also be dry and scaly. Also known as discoid eczema, it is believed that insect bites, dry skin during the winter, or other skin inflammations may cause the condition.
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Topical Steroid Withdrawl (Red Skin Syndrome)

Topical Steroid Withdrawl (Red Skin Syndrome)
Topical Steroid Withdrawl (Red Skin Syndrome)
Topical Steroid Withdrawl (Red Skin Syndrome)
Topical Steroid Withdrawl (Red Skin Syndrome)

Topical Steroid Withdrawl (Red Skin Syndrome)

A small percentage of people who use topical corticosteroids develop topical steroid addiction (TSA), which is also called red burning skin syndrome (RBSS). Unlike other addictions, TSA is not usually characterized by a compulsive need to use the medication. Rather, it has been called an addiction because the skin symptoms become worse than before the treatment when the medication is discontinued. This withdrawal reaction is characterized by a redness of the skin (erythema) that often develops where the AD was initially and spreads across the body day by day.
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Topical Steroid Withdrawl (Red Skin Syndrome)

Topical Steroid Withdrawl (Red Skin Syndrome)

A small percentage of people who use topical corticosteroids develop topical steroid addiction (TSA), which is also called red burning skin syndrome (RBSS). Unlike other addictions, TSA is not usually characterized by a compulsive need to use the medication. Rather, it has been called an addiction because the skin symptoms become worse than before the treatment when the medication is discontinued. This withdrawal reaction is characterized by a redness of the skin (erythema) that often develops where the AD was initially and spreads across the body day by day.
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Topical Steroid Withdrawl (Red Skin Syndrome)

Topical Steroid Withdrawl (Red Skin Syndrome)

A small percentage of people who use topical corticosteroids develop topical steroid addiction (TSA), which is also called red burning skin syndrome (RBSS). Unlike other addictions, TSA is not usually characterized by a compulsive need to use the medication. Rather, it has been called an addiction because the skin symptoms become worse than before the treatment when the medication is discontinued. This withdrawal reaction is characterized by a redness of the skin (erythema) that often develops where the AD was initially and spreads across the body day by day.
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Testing

Patch Test
Skin Prick Test
Patch Test

Patch Test

Patch tests use patches containing allergens that are placed on the skin and worn for 48 hours. Patch tests can be helpful to detect allergic contact dermatitis, which causes a delayed allergic reaction of the skin.
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Skin Prick Test

Skin Prick Test

Skin prick testing involves applying a diluted allergen with a prick or puncture on the surface of the skin. The skin is observed for approximately 15 minutes to see if a reaction develops. A positive reaction to the allergen is a “wheal,” a raised, red bump and a surrounding flare, of area of redness.
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