Spotting Fake Eczema Instagram Accounts

Spotting Fake Eczema Instagram Accounts

One of my biggest pet peeves and one of the dark sides of being connected to the online eczema community is when I see a social media account that is purely created to prey on the desperation of people that are looking for an answer or cure for eczema. These people, in my opinion, are too cold and heartless to take advantage of this health issue just to make a buck.

Being aware of spam and solicitation

After observing these accounts for the past year and having them try to solicit me either for sale or to actually promote the products to sell on my Eczema Phoenix profile, here are some patterns that I’ve noticed that can help you or someone you know of avoid getting in deep and wasting your money on these fake eczema accounts.

Personal or tagged photos

Check to see if the person has any photos of themselves on any of their social media profiles or at the very least on the website in their bio. While I know there are real people with eczema who don’t want to put a picture of themselves because of the rashes on their face, usually, most eczema accounts have at least one photo of some part of the face or body that has eczema in their Instagram feed.

Credibility in tagging

Check if this account only has posts that are all text or photos of other people than themselves and they do not tag or credit the people in the photos. Then, it is likely that they stole all the photos to use to promote their account and the product they’re selling to create some level of credibility.

Tunnel vision

Their account is a hard sell for a product or service if the only thing you see is about one miracle product, technique, or service that they promote. It’s probably just a part of their sales funnel.

Stories and recollections

If the person doesn’t provide any photos of their eczema, then at the very least, a real eczema account will have a lot of very detailed stories and recollections of their own experience living with eczema. Things that are just so specific and thorough that you know that they would only know to write about those things having lived through it.

Short and sweet

If the website’s very short and sweet and they don’t have much to say about eczema, they may not have gone through it, much less would know what products to recommend for it. Real people with eczema always have a lot to say about it because we go through a lot of pain living with it.

Promoting products

About a year ago I was toying with the idea of doing affiliate marketing and purchased a couple of online courses on how to do it successfully. My intention was to promote products that I had genuine real results with. To me, this was ethical affiliate marketing since I promote products that I love on my own anyway. I thought this might be a decent way to get a little bit of a kickback for the free promotion that I provide on my own.

Knowing the signs

But, having taken a couple of these online courses, I have seen some of the website templates that they use and recognize them in some of the eczema accounts that I’ve come across. These accounts always have only one profile photo and maybe a decent backstory. But, there are no photos, proof, or other kinds of validating resources to suggest the person is living with eczema, used the product, or received any testimonials from real customers who have successfully used the featured product.

Hope you found these tips handy! Have you spotted a fake eczema account before? What are the telltale markers that you notice? Please share in the comments section below, so we can all wise up to these predatory bozos!

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The AtopicDermatitis.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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