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Managing Eczema with Artificial Nails

Living with eczema will have you desperately seek for tricks and tips to help you manage its symptoms. So when I found out that artificial nails helped me deal with scratching less, I took full advantage of it. That’s why for the past four years, and never missing an appointment, I’ve been getting artificial nails done non-stop.

Growing up with eczema

As a young girl living with eczema and scratching uncontrollably, I always had my nails short and unpainted. I did my best to avoid nail salons and would only go for special occasions. I never saw the purpose of doing my nails personally or getting them done professionally as I knew I would just scratch them away sooner or later.

Vulnerable moment: Whenever I would be invited to go get my nails done, I would reject and make up the excuse that I wasn’t a “nails” girl. But I was. It was one of those things I deeply wished I could do, almost like a confirmation to myself that I was a pretty girl. But instead, I envied girls who had long and beautiful nails from afar.

Topical steroid withdrawal (TSW)

It wasn’t until I was going through topical steroid withdrawal (TSW) in 2014 that I valued getting my nails done professionally.

I was feeling so horrible, both mentally and physically, that I needed an escape or something to make me feel beautiful. I needed to feel in control and my nails seemed to be the only thing I had power over.

Getting acrylic nails

So with my swollen hands and crippled body, I would make my way to the nail salon. Although I was slightly insecure about what I looked like and how people would view me, I knew that how I would feel afterward would help me overcome that fear.

What resulted was not only the emotion of feeling beautiful beyond my TSW, but I realized how much these artificial nails actually helped my eczema in the long run.

Benefits of acrylic nails

They can cause less damage on your skin

When it came to scratching, I soon realized that my artificial nails would almost glide over my skin without it causing severe damage. Because there is a thick coating around your nail, it is harder to tear the surface of your skin. Think about it: the thinner your nails, the easier it is to rip through your skin due to its sharpness. But if the edges of your nails are thick, you’ll be able to get away with less damage even if you do scratch. Win!

They can promote nail growth

Due to the constant scratching and stress, my nails were often weak and easily broken. However, with the use of artificial nails, I have been able to experience significant growth and durability for the first time in my life. The coating of the artificial nail will create a hard barrier on top of your existing nail, leaving it strong and robust!

They can help make you feel beautiful

Despite how my eczema would make me feel, I would always look down at my hands and think, “Well at least my nails look done and pretty!” This one small act of change often broke the vicious cycles of itching and insecurities. I have made it my very own eczema distractor.

Question: Do you use artificial nails to help you manage your eczema?

Be sure to check out my article on artificial nail enhancements (coming soon!) to see which type works best for you and warnings to consider!

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The AtopicDermatitis.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

  • ckbridgett
    1 month ago

    Thank you! Great post!
    Do beware however that all rhythmic skin contact can ignite the inbuilt instinctual scratching habit we all harbour – some more than others – and if you think this applies to you, check out how habit reversal training may offer the best solution.
    ➡️ https://www.atopicskindisease.com/articles/Nails

  • Sarah Wallin moderator
    4 weeks ago

    @ckbridgett, thanks for sharing your insight. The habit of scratching is a hard one to break, and I agree it’s a bit part of this discussion. I’m linking another article that talks about breaking the scratching habit: (https://atopicdermatitis.net/living/scratching-habit/). -Sarah (AtopicDermatitis.net Team Member)

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